Jan 12 2011

brion vega cemetery

I first visited this place when I was doing a semester at syracuse’s florence program – it is located in the middle of nowhere in the midst of cornfields and very small towns. finding it again years later was a challenge since it was still the early days of internet and very much before gps systems. the entire experience from the perimeter walls, which are built to the height of a stalk of corn – to the common color of the cast angled concrete walls begin a story of what this cemetery is all about. this was arguably carlo scarpa’s masterpiece work and on one of the exterior walls, in an unimportant corner – scarpa, himself, is buried there standing in a vertical position 6 feet under the ground. it is a magical experience to walk through and realize every material, every decision is deliberate but still extremely poetic – as scarpa was so very capable of creating. it is well worth a visit if you are in the veneto – it is close to many of the palladian villas – like Emo…

Brion Vega Cemetery
San Vito d’Altivole
near Treviso


Dec 27 2010

snow globe jars

roman and milo came home from winter camp here in LA with these. seems like a great way to make a snow globe and create something rather unique…


Dec 27 2010

venice biennale

we took the boys to the 2009 venice biennale. it was such a memorable experience and thoroughly enjoyable. a gorgeous veneto summer day, each pavilion was better than the next. the highlight was the combined show between the scandinavian pavilions that tied their stories together. there was an intricate storyline of a falling out between neighbors that you first confronted when you saw a dead body floating face down in a shallow pool, a pack of cigarettes and a watch at the bottom of the pool. another show was a dark murky walk through russian writers. the only bad experience was the us pavilion, which had a bruce nauman show. they actually had a guy with a clipboard, whose job it was to act as an LA maitre’d – stopping you from entering and warning you not to touch anything. the rest of show is so much about exploring and revealing mysteries – this was a truly american experience. one other highlight was chile – that had a man dressed in a fine suit who would whistle every once in a while and start a whistle and animal sound dialogue with other projections of himself around the other walls of the small space…

 

 


Dec 24 2010

the boys room – in apartment therapy

Names: Roman, Milo, Luca
Ages: 9, 5 and 2
Location: Bel Air, CA
Room size: 11′ x 12′ (roughly)

With a two-bedroom house and three young boys to accomodate, Irwin Miller had to get creative. His innovative use of all the nooks, recesses and alcoves results in a comfortable, efficient room that gives all three brothers their own place as well as an inspiring shared space. read more…


Dec 20 2010

fresh pasta making

I am amazed that the recipe for making egg pasta is so deceptively simple. it’s really all about the best ingredients when you have something as simple as this…

  • 2 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup semolina flour
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 Tbs. olive oil
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 Tbs. water, plus more as needed

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the flat beater, combine the all-purpose and semolina flours, salt and olive oil. Beat on low speed just until combined, about 30 seconds. In a small pitcher or other pourable container, whisk together the eggs and water. With the mixer on low speed, slowly drizzle in the egg mixture and beat until the flour has been absorbed into the egg mixture, about 2 minutes. Stop the mixer and, using your hands, squeeze a small amount of dough into a ball. It should be moist enough to hold together but not sticky; if it is too dry, add more water, 1 tsp. at a time. Transfer the dough to a work surface and shape into 2 balls. Wrap separately with plastic wrap, then flatten each ball into a disk. Let stand at room temperature for at least 30 minutes or up to 2 hours. (williams-sonoma recipe)


Dec 9 2010

paper santa

roman made this after school – I like the 2 separate parts connected by red yarn…


Dec 5 2010

banqueting house – some interiors

a few shots of when we stayed there. no tv, just quiet fireplace living…and a mac laptop for roman. very peaceful


Dec 5 2010

banqueting house, gibside

years ago when milo was born, we rented these ‘castles’ outside of london. heidi found a great resource called the landmark trust. the houses and castles are furnished and can hold 2-10 people. this one was on a huge estate in northumbria and had been a tea house folly overlooking a pond below….

from their website:

Gibside was inherited in 1722 by George Bowes, a landowner and public figure made rich by coal. After his first wife died, he made Gibside his home and set about embellishing the park. The Banqueting House seems to have been finished by 1746. It was designed by Daniel Garrett, a former assistant of Lord Burlington’s, to stand in the highest part of the park, looking over the Derwent valley.

When we first saw The Banqueting House in 1977 it was almost entirely roofless and the porch and crocketed gables had collapsed. The park, now happily transferred to the National Trust by the Earl of Strathmore and open to the public, was let to the Forestry Commission and The Banqueting House was hidden by trees.

Here was, however, an important building of most original design, part of a famous landscape. The Forestry Commission agreed to give up their lease of it and the Strathmore Estate then sold us the freehold. Most of the missing stonework was found nearby and inside we were able to save much of the plasterwork and joinery of one room. But the Great Room was just a shell: here we replaced only the main elements of Garrett’s design, known from an old photograph.

The Banqueting House now stands in a grassy clearing, looking down to an octagonal pool and the valley beyond. Nearby, the Column of British Liberty rises high above the trees and a little further off lies the Gibside chapel, designed by James Paine in 1760 to hold the remains of George Bowes, ancestor of our Queen.

the landmark trust

Booking enquiries Phone 01628 825925
Email bookings@landmarktrust.org.uk
The Booking Office is normally open Monday to Friday 9am – 6pm, Saturday 10am – 4pm.


Dec 4 2010

paradise cove

chilly week in LA. heidi’s brother visited and we spent the afteroon at paradise cove…


Dec 4 2010

the miller chicken coop

We ended up finally getting chickens last year from my son’s kindergarten class. each spring the students in our local school hatch eggs the chicks are available for ready and willing parents and neighbors. we got 2 chickens to start and once they got larger than the original wooden wine box they were living in as chicks – it was time to build a more substantial home. the majority of the project was repurposed content from my wood shop, fallen fence elements and a lot of borrowed aged wood timbers from my neighbor’s yard. the approximate size is base on a 24×48 standard size. there are 4 beds and a sort of side sun room on the side.

After months of use  and a rainy LA winter – the house has performed extremely well – it has stayed dry inside and cozy and the chickens use the side room to stretch in the morning and let us know when they would like to be let out. We have recently added some new birds and I foresee the main coop getting an addition this summer.

Update: after a year of having the chickens roam totally free on our property – I decided to add a chicken run to keep them a bit more contained. Chickens like to eat all plants and everything green – and the love to dig in dirt. The new chicken run is mostly 2×2 redwood studs with 3 shades of green paint and an accent orange. We reused our former kitchen screen door as the entry – and they seem very happy and content with their new property

Read more here at Apartment Therapy